▼Japanese  
  The Unbearable Dreams 8:
Somewhere by Asia Meets Asia: Or “Asia” as “Object”


What happens when Asia meets Asia? Asia Meets Asia (AMA) is a nonprofit organization that seeks to answer this question through theatrical performances. Since 1997 AMA has organized a yearly theater festival, inviting participants from all over Asia to its own theater called Proto-Theater, focusing on independent, politically engaged theater companies outside the mainstream. The organization also gathers performers from different countries to work on collaborative projects to create original pieces with which to tour various regions of Asia.

However, in recent years, AMA had to cut back the scale of its activities, and from the perspective of the general theatrical scene in Japan, it only occupies a minor position. Yet, without a doubt, AMA’s endeavor remains essential for the Japanese theater because of its regional engagements in Asia, commitment to creating original works, and fundamental philosophy.

Once it was a common practice in Japanese theater for a dramatist or a theatrical group to create a work, and to tour with it. This practice was also supported by the belief that the itinerancy itself constituted the activist “movement.” Asia Meets Asia does not go abroad just for the sake of experience, nor does it invite foreign companies just because the budget allows it. Their activities have gone beyond the “theater festivals” that merely gather foreign companies, and evolved into the creation of original collaborative works that can return back to Asia and tour.

After watching a performance by Asia Meets Asia, one cannot but ask the question, “What is Asia?” “Asia” as a concept is a construct of Western Orientalism. As such, “Asia” is both present and absent. Ethnically, geographically, and conceptually, as soon as we try to grasp its essence, “Asia” becomes something ambiguous and indefinable. But at the same time, we cannot simply deny its existence. The “Orientalist” gaze from the West has also brought into being its own complement in the form of “Occidentalism,” the gaze from Asia to the West. Asia has internalized the Western gaze, and in turn began casting its longing eyes to the West as modernity itself.

Once thus established, this gaze created the multiple, and often fragmentary, consciousness of the self and the other within Asia. Historically, the concept of “Asia” was used as an effective tool to criticize and mark the “West” as the other. However, within the region, the concept had dual functions. In Japanese modernity, while the rhetoric of Asian unity and the liberation from the Western colonialism was proclaimed towards the outside world, internally its manifestation was in the form of discriminations and violence.

Despite temporary regional reshufflings based on economy, the dualistic relationship between “Asia” and the “West” hasn’t changed even after the diffusion of various critical theories on orientalism and post-colonialism in the 80s and the 90s. The localism as the byproduct of globalization has been absorbed into nationalism that is casting an ominous shadow in the region.

The Unbearable Dreams 8: Somewhere that AMA performed this time reflects concept such as Asia’s inner duality and its currently progressing situations, but it also makes the audience aware of their own desire to project such meanings onto the performance.

The staging of the work avoids one dimensionality of a single perspective. The performers are gathered from Pusan, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Bangalore in India, Baguio in the Philippines, and from those residing in Japan. While all the performers are involved in the staging as collaborators, Hiroshi Ohashi, the organizer of the theatrical company, DA-M and the representative of AMA, plays the central role as the director.

In describing a performance including so many people from so many different places in Asia, one can easily fall into the trope of “Asian diversity and richness,” but the actual stage betrays such facile characterization. Instead, the performance shows both the similarities and the differences within the idea of “Asia.” If you watch this performance looking for “Asia,” one would find such an easy framework dissolving quickly. One cannot distinguish the nationalities of the performers just from appearance. Maybe some people may be able to tell the differences from the color of the skin, physical build, atmosphere and the mannerism and such, but what those differences show is ambiguous. Perhaps, it is only because we ourselves project the mirage called “Asia” that we think we see those differences. The differences in the movements of the performers, who also are dancers, cannot be reduced to the differences in the national origins, but rather, due more to the physical abilities of the individuals.

What actually takes place on the stage is an aggregation of simple movements without a storyline. The performance is built around the reactions of the performers to the numerous stones placed on the stage. The work portrays the performers’ connections to the stones and with each other. Since it also includes impromptu elements, the details change with every performance.

Within the featureless space of the Proto-Theater, the stage is empty exposed concrete surface lit mainly by florescent light. The performers pick up the numerous stones placed there, move them, and put them down. They repeat various movements like offering a stone, picking it up, raising it up, moving it, rolling it, playing with it, throwing it, jumping up with it, etc. Or they may pull on a stone, or try to show its material nature, or the burden picking up a stone places on their bodies. Numerous performers continue to repeat these simple movements and gestures.

Because it is a multilingual performance, words are spoken in various languages when names are called or conversations take place, but they are all very simple. In the multilingualism of the performance, the materiality of words as code is foregrounded more than their meanings. Words become something inorganic like the stones on the stage. In the same way, actions are reduced to movements without meanings, as words sometimes become noise.

Of course, various scenes are constructed to leave an impression that could function as a metaphor to be interpreted freely by the audience. There is a scene in which the performers gather together as a group, and move together like a floating school of fish. Those in the front moves back and change places with those in the back before you realize the change, and the movement of the group fold back on itself. This may certainly suggest Asia’s collectivity. The scene in which a performer spits on a stone, also may suggest the violence within Asia. There are many scenes like those that present various images of Asia.

Compared to another version of Unbearable Dream I saw in 2005, which was strongly improvisational almost like a workshop piece, the current version is far more carefully constructed and finished work. But the importance of this work is in creating multitude of images, and simultaneously destroying them. One-dimensional images of Asia that audience members may have are continuously presented, but the work rejects the formation of unified conclusion out of them.

That is like Asia itself, being both present and absent at the same time. We can say that Asia is something that is desired as an “object,” but could never be obtained. Series of images can certainly evoke
This object by its excessiveness, but at the same time those images themselves must be examined critically. Why does the audience think about the violence inside “Asia” when they look at a performer spitting at a stone or cursing in languages they can’t understand? The connotation of the word, “Asia,” makes one imagine more things than necessary, but in the actual performance of Unbearable Dream, there are only simple movements. Thus, the performance functions as a double-edged criticism.

By actually using the bodies of performers assembled from various regions as “objects,” the performance tells us that “Asia” exists, simultaneously as it is absent, that it is an “object.” Of course, this perspective is critical of the current situation in which “Asia” is excessively seen through nationalism.

The project of “Asia Meets Asia” itself is changing during its history of over ten years. Going beyond the era of discovering Asia or teaching about it, the project now presents Asia as an “object” that criticizes the excess of images. This performance recovers the word, “Asia” that has been used too freely, and casts critical eyes towards the current situation.




▲Top
 
 

ワンダーランド wonderland - http://www.wonderlands.jp –

Asia meets AsiaUnbearable Dreams 8 Somewhere

·       投稿者: 編集部 20141022 13:30 高橋宏幸 

アジアという「もの」  高橋宏幸

 

アジア・ミーツ・アジア(Asia Meets Asia)という、アジアとアジアが出会うとは何か、という問いを、舞台を通して行っている団体がある。1997年に始まって以来、それは継続的に、アジアのさまざまな地域の、そのなかでもとくにインディペンデントで、体制に迎合せず、ポリティカルなイシューを作品に取り混んでいる、といくつも言葉を足すことができる集団の作品を招聘して、フェスティバルを開催していた。
 もしくは、それらの劇団のパフォーマーたちを集めて、コラボレーション作品を作っている。そして、いくつかのアジアの地域を、その作品でツアーする。ただ、ここ最近は、かつてに比べれば規模自体は小さくなり、日本の演劇ギョーカイのなかで見てしまえば、マイナーな流れとなっている。
 だが、その試みは圧倒的に重要な位置を占めている。アジアという地域のなかで活動すること、作品という形態にすること、そしてその根底に、なぜそのようなことをするのか、という行動に伴う思想とでもいうべきものがあるからだ。
.

 かつての日本の演劇においても、作家や集団が作品を作り、それとともに移動して公演をすることは、当たり前だが、その動機を支える思想に裏付けられたものだった。移動とは運動と同義だったのだ。海外で作品を上演すること、もしくは海外からの作品を招聘することは、たんに海外で公演してみたい、もしくは予算がおりたから招聘することとは違う。アジア・ミーツ・アジアが、いわゆる作品を招聘するフェスティバルから、コラボレーション作品をつくり、それをもってアジアの地域をツアーして活動をするようになったのも、いわゆる「フェスティバル」との差を提示している。
 
  実際、アジア・ミーツ・アジアの公演を観るたびに、否が応でもいくつものことを考えさせられる。


 たとえば、「アジア」とはなにか。
 「アジア」なるものは、西洋からの視点、オリエンタリズムによってあらわれたものだ。だから、「アジア」というものを考えるとき、それはあると同時にない。実体的につかもうとすると、民族的にも、地理的にも、概念的にも、その定義は曖昧さのなかにあって、決定不能なものへと変化していく。かといって、それはない、と片づけてしまうこともできない。西洋からの視点は、同時にアジアから西洋へと向けられた視点、オクシデンタリズムも作ったからだ。それは相互で補完的な関係を結んでいる。
 
  そして、いったん向けられたアジアへの視線は、アジアのなかにおいても、複数の、ときに引き裂かれた他者として、互いの存在を認識させた。歴史的に見てしまえば、アジアという言葉は、ときには批判のための有効なツールとして、西洋を異化させる。しかし、内側に目を向ければ、二重の構造を抱えた。歴史的には、アジアの連帯が叫ばれるときは、近代化の中では西洋列強からの植民地の解放を外に向けては謳ったが、内側に向けては、差別と暴力をふるう。

 
  経済的な下部構造をベースに、一時的に地勢図は変わりを見せても、西洋があるから、今もってアジアが見いだされるという構造は、1990年代のポストコロニアルやオリエンタリズムという理論の普及以後も変わっていない。いや、グローバリズムが反面で生み出したローカリティは、ナショナリズムに吸収される形でより明確に陰鬱な状況を伴って現れている。ヘゲモニー闘争の舞台の中心は、近代以前の東アジアの大国と周辺という図式に変わり、その秩序と安定は、現代ならばアメリカという帝国を通して保たれる。その意味では、やはり「アジア」なるもののイメージは、アジア内において作られるのではなく、グローバリティの中心にいる場所、現在ならばアメリカによって、生み出されている。

 
  今回、上演された『Unbearable Dreams8 Somewhere』という作品も、そのような概念、内なるアジアの二重性や、進行するアジアの事態といった問題が描かれていると同時に、半面で観る側からのイメージの暴力として、舞台の表象から、それらを強く読み取ろうとしていることに気づかされる。

 舞台の現れは、そのようなどちらか一方からの、一面的な見方をかわす。パフォーマーたちを地域でみると、釜山、上海、香港、インドのバンガロール、フィリピンのバギオなど、そして日本在住者を集めて構成される。彼ら自身も共同で演出をして構成しているのだが、中心的な演出の役割は、劇団DA・Mを主宰し、アジア・ミーツ・アジアの代表でもある大橋宏だ。
 
  これだけの地域から人を集めて舞台を作ると、一言でアジアという多様性の豊潤さ、などと言ってしまいそうになるが、舞台は必ずしもそうならない。むしろ、舞台の現れとしては、アジアという括りのなかで、その差異とはなにかを考えるための同質性も現れる。「アジア」という視点でこの舞台を観た場合、想像する分かりやすいアジアのフレームは消えていく。

 当たり前だが、国籍の差は見たところで分からない。肌の色や骨格、雰囲気、たたずまい、身体の身振りの差は、分かる人は分かるが、そこから見えてくるものは、微妙な差異だ。それは、むしろアジアという幻影をこちらが投影しているからこそ、想像してしまうものだ。ダンサーでもあるパフォーマーなどの動きの差は、地域の差に還元できるものではなく、ダンスの技能をもつ身体性の差だ。
 
  実際、この舞台で行われることは至ってシンプルな行為の集積であり、物語はない。中心にあるのは、舞台に置かれた数々の石たちを媒介に、たくさんのパフォーマーがそれに接触するなかで生まれる、石から人へ、人から人へとつながっていく結節点を描くものだ。しかも、なかば即興的な要素を含んでいる分、細部は毎回変わって作られる。

 プロト・シアターの無機質な空間で、主に蛍光灯で照らされた、なにも組まれていないコンクリートがさらけ出された舞台。パフォーマーたちが、無数の置かれた石を移動させたり、置いたり、さまざまな行為を繰り返す。たとえば、石を差し出す、拾う、掲げる、運ぶ、転がす、遊ぶ、投げる、跳ねる、などなど。もしくは、引っ張ったり、石そのものの物質性を見せたり、石を持つことで身体にかかる負荷を示したりする。多くのパフォーマーたちが、それらのシンプルな動作やしぐさを、ただただ繰り返す。
 
   たしかに多言語であるがゆえに、名前を呼んだり、会話が行われたり、いくつもの言語が現れるときもあるが、それもシンプルなものだ。多言語性といっても、言葉の意味というよりも、まるで記号の物質性のように映り、石と同じように無機的なものとなる。だから、行為もまた意味ではなく動作として映され、言葉もときに音となる。


 むろん、数々のシーンは印象的に作られて、それは観客に自由に読み解かせるメタファーともなる。パフォーマーたちが集団にかたまり、一群の群れとなって、たゆたうように歩くシーンがある。前にいたものがいつのまにか移動して後ろへと交代して、前面から中へと入ったりする。それは、確かにアジアという集団性がそこにあるように感じる。石に向かってつばを吐くシーンなども、アジアの内側にある暴力性を感じさせる。その意味で、ほかにも数多あるシーンは、いくつものイメージを与える。

【写真は「Unbearable Dreams 8 Somewhere」公演から。撮影=中村和夫 提供=アジア・ミーツ・アジア 禁無断転載】

 かつて、二〇〇五年に観た『Unbearable Dream』の別のバージョンにおけるワークショップかと思うような即興作品に比べたら、はるかに精緻に作られて、作品として成立している。
 だが、この作品の重要さとは、あらゆるイメージを半面で作りながら、半面で壊しているところにある。それぞれの観客がもつ、アジアなるものの一面的なイメージは、絶えず想像させられるが、それのみでまとめられることを拒絶する。

 それこそが、アジアはあるが、同時にないということである。いわば、アジアとは「もの」として求められるものであり、決して満たされるものではない。それは、イメージとして確かになにかを剰余として喚起させる。だが、そのような過剰なイメージそのものが、同時に批判されるべきものでもある。石につばを吐き、言葉として何を言っているのか分からないが罵るようなシーンに、なぜ「アジア」なるものが孕んだ暴力を人は思うのか。「アジア」という言葉のバイアスは、そこに必要異常のものをイメージさせるが、実際のパフォーマンスとしては、そこに単なる行為しかないのだ。いわば、その両義的な批判性を成立させているのが、この舞台なのだ。

 だから、実際的に各地域のパフォーマーたちの、身体という「もの」を提示して、「アジア」は、あると同時にないと語っているのだ。いわば、「もの」である、と。むろん、それは現在の過剰なまでに、ナショナリスティックにアジアを見る状況に対しては、批判性をもっている。
 アジア・ミーツ・アジアという企画自体が、十年を超えた歴史の中で変遷しているのだろう。アジアを発見する、もしくは啓蒙する時代を過ぎて、いまや過剰なるイメージをも批判する、「もの」としてのアジア。これは、自由に使われてしまった「アジア」という言葉を奪還し、そして現在の状況に対する批評的な舞台だ。

【筆者略歴】
高橋宏幸(たかはし・ひろゆき)
 1978年岐阜県生まれ。演劇批評。桐朋学園芸術短期大学・日本女子大学非常勤講師。「図書新聞」、「テアトロ」、「日経新聞」などで連載。評論に「プレ・アンダーグラウンド演劇と60年安保」(『批評研究 vol1』)、「原爆演劇と原発演劇」(『述5』)、「マイノリティの歪な位置つかこうへい」(『文藝別冊』)など多数。2013年度は、Asian Cultural CouncilACC)の助成をうけ、ニューヨーク大学客員研究員。
ワンダーランド寄稿一覧:http://www.wonderlands.jp/archives/category/ta/takahashi-hiroyuki/

【上演記録】
Asia meets Asia
Unbearable Dreams8 Somewher
2014
9413日(プロト・シアター

http://www.wonderlands.jp/archives/category/ta/takahashi-hiroyuki/

 
  ▲Top